Saturday, May 29, 2010

Front Yard

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Thursday, May 27, 2010

BOGUS

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Sunday, May 23, 2010

Defalcation

defalcation \dee-fal-KAY-shun\ noun
*1 : the act or an instance of embezzling
2 : a failure to meet a promise or an expectation

Example sentence:
"'She made off with the money, an act of defalcation that disqualifies her from receiving a bankruptcy discharge,' the judge ruled." (Orlando Sentinel, March 21, 2004)

Did you know?
"The tea table shall be set forth every morning with its customary bill of fare, and without any manner of defalcation." No reference to embezzlement there! This line, from a 1712 issue of Spectator magazine, is an example of the earliest, and now archaic, sense of "defalcation," which is simply defined as "curtailment." "Defalcation" is ultimately from the Latin word "falx," meaning "sickle" (a tool for cutting), and it has been a part of English since the 1400s. It was used early on of monetary cutbacks (as in "a defalcation in their wages"), and by the 1600s it was used of most any sort of financial reversal (as in "a defalcation of public revenues"). Not till the mid-1800s, however, did "defalcation" refer to breaches of trust that cause a financial loss, or, specifically, to embezzlement.


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Saturday, May 22, 2010

What am I gonna do when this dude moves away?

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Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Rabbit pup held by Ivan.

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RABBIT PUP

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Tuesday, May 18, 2010

You see receipts. I see THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT.

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Gravamen

gravamen \gruh-VAY-mun\ noun
: the material or significant part of a grievance or complaint

Example sentence:
The gravamen of Walter's letter to the editor was that the newspaper frequently reported on the school system's failures but rarely covered its successes and improvements.

Did you know?
"Gravamen" is not a word you hear every day, but it does show up occasionally in modern-day publications. It comes from the Latin verb "gravare," meaning "to burden," and ultimately from the Latin adjective "gravis," meaning "heavy." Fittingly, "gravamen" refers to the part of a grievance or complaint that gives it weight or substance. In legal contexts, "gravamen" is used, synonymously with "gist," to refer to the grounds on which a legal action is sustainable. "Gravis" has given English several other weighty words, including "gravity," "grieve," and the adjective "grave," meaning "important" or "serious."


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Saturday, May 15, 2010

All natural

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He makes badass omlettes.

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Friday, May 14, 2010

She knows something about ginger snaps

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She knows something about roses.

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Thursday, May 13, 2010

You can buy this over the counter now?

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Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Seems like I've been here before.

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Wednesday, May 05, 2010

Nonsocomial

nosocomial \nah-suh-KOH-mee-ul\ adjective
: acquired or occurring in a hospital

Example sentence:
Mariah had expected to be out of the hospital today, but she was told that she had developed a nosocomial infection that would need to be monitored by the staff for at least 24 hours.

Did you know?
"Nosocomial" is a word that usually occurs in formal medical contexts; specifically, in reference to hospital-acquired sickness. We hope you never encounter "nosocomial" as part of your own medical diagnosis, but if you do, you might want to remember that the term descends from "nosocomium," the Late Latin word for "hospital." "Nosocomium" in turn traces to the Greek "nosos," meaning "disease." That root has given English other words as well, including "zoonosis" ("a disease communicable from animals to humans under natural conditions") and "nosology" ("a classification or list of diseases" or "a branch of medical science that deals with classification of diseases").

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Monday, May 03, 2010

Repine

repine \rih-PYNE\ verb
1 : to feel or express dejection or discontent : complain
*2 : to long for something

Example sentence:
"They saw less of each other, and Robyn was aware that this did not cause her to repine as much as perhaps it should have done." (David Lodge, Nice Work)

Did you know?
In longing, one can "repine over" something ("repining over her lost past"), or one can "pine for" something. The two words, used thus, mean close to the same thing, but not exactly. "Pining" is intense longing for what one once knew. "Repine" adds an element of discontent to any longing -- an element carried over from its first sense ("to feel or express dejection or discontent"), which has been in use since the 16th century. (Washington Irving used the first sense in his 1820 work The Sketch Book: "Through the long and weary day he repines at his unhappy lot.") "Pine" and "repine" are from Old English "pinian" ("to suffer") and probably ultimately from Latin "poena" ("punishment"). "Poena" also gave us our word "pain."


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Saturday, May 01, 2010

Palimpsest

palimpsest \PAL-imp-sest\ noun
1 : writing material (as a parchment or tablet) used one or more times after earlier writing has been erased
*2 : something having usually diverse layers or aspects apparent beneath the surface

Example sentence:
"Canada, like any country, is a palimpsest, an overlay of classes and generations." (Margaret Atwood, New York Times Book Review, March 10, 1985)


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